Tell Me Why We Have Hurricanes

Tell Me Why We Have Hurricanes

Tamra B. Orr

Language: English

Pages: 28

ISBN: 2:00366396

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Young children are naturally curious about the world around them. We Have Hurricanes offers answers to their most compelling questions about hurricanes. Age-appropriate explanations and appealing photos encourage readers to continue their quest for knowledge. Additional text features and search tools, including a glossary and an index, help students locate information and learn new words.

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Te l l M e W h y We Have Hurricanes Tamra B. Orr Published in the United States of America by Cherry Lake Publishing Ann Arbor, Michigan www.cherrylakepublishing.com Content Adviser: Jack Williams, Fellow of the American Meteorological Society Reading Adviser: Marla Conn, ReadAbility, Inc Photo Credits: © NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr Images, 5; © Cheryl Casey/Shutterstock Images, 7; © behindlens/Shutterstock Images, cover, 1, 9; © Zacarias Pereira da Mata/Shutterstock Images, 11;

causing damage and harm dropsonde (DROP-sond) an instrument attached to a parachute and released into a storm from an aircraft evaporates (ih-VAP-uh-rayts) changes from a liquid or solid state into vapor eye (EYE) the center of a hurricane where winds are calm inland (IN-luhnd) located away from the sea landslides (LAND-slydz) the downward falling or sliding of masses of soil or rocks from steep slopes radio transmitter (RAY-dee-oh transMIT-ur) a device that sends out radio waves with the sounds

heard on a radio storm surge (STORM SURJ) an abnormal rise in the level of the sea along a coast caused by a hurricane or other strong storm tornadoes (tor-NAY-dohz) windstorms characterized by long, funnel-shaped clouds hanging from the bottom of a thunderstorm tropical storms (TRAH-pi-kuhl STORMZ) storms that form over a warm ocean with fastest winds between 37 and 63 miles per hour typhoons (tye-FOONZ) large storms that form over the northwestern Pacific Ocean Find Out More Books: Carson,

readers of all ages. Although she lives in Oregon today, she grew up in northern Indiana and remembers hiding in the basement when tornado warnings were issued. While too far away from water to worry about hurricanes, she can still imagine their incredible power. 24

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Index.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 About the Author. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 s r e t n u H e n a c i r r The Hu “Whoa!” said Kennedy, walking into the kitchen. “That documentary was amazing!” “What’s your new passion this time?” Mom asked. “It was all about hurricane hunters,” he said. “They’re

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